The comparative study among the MRSAcin, Nisin A and vancomycin, on biofilm formation by Methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food sources.

¹Hind H. Muunim, Muna T Al-Mossawei, Mais Emad Ahmed

Abstract


Biofilms formation by pathogens microbial Control considered important in medical research because it is the hazarded virulence factor leading to becoming difficult to treat because of its high resistance to antimicrobials. Glycopeptide antibiotic a (Vancomycin) and the commercial bacteriocin (Nisin A) were used to comparative with purification bacteriocin (MRSAcin) against MRSA biofilm. One hundred food samples were collected from Baghdad markets from July 2016 to September 2016, including (cheese, yogurt, raw milk, fried meat, grilled meat, and beef burger). All samples were cultures; S. aureus was confirmation by macroscopic culture and microscopic examination, in addition to biochemical tests. Methicillin resistance S. asureus (MRSA) were identification by antibiotic sensitivity test (AST), Vitek 2 system. The result shown the 60(60%) isolate were identified as S. aureus and 45(75%) gave positive result as MRSA isolate, M13 isolate was chosen as MRSA isolates highest biofilm formation for treatment with MRSAcin, Nisin A(bacteriocin) and Vancomycin (antibiotic) to compared the more antimicrobial have bacteriocidal effect. The sensitivity test uses to determine the effect of MRSAcin, Nisin A, and Vancomycin MIC on MRSA planktonic cell by (WDA). The new study shows the impacts of new kind Pure Bacteriocins (MRSAcin) from methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) highly effects then (Vancomycin and Nisin A) at different concentration. In a current study aimed to suggest new Bacteriocin is potent highly for the treatment of resistant bacteria biofilm infections in food preservatives

Keywords


MRSA, Bacteriocin, vancomycin, Nisin, Biofilm.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.25258/ijddt.9.3.31

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